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PACT demands Scottish indie support

British producers’ body PACT wants local and network TV commissioners to better support Scotland’s production sector.

JohnMcVay_NewA new study, created in association with social research firm EKOS and Prospero, found that local commissioning could play a key role in developing the production sector, that co-commissioning should be supported and that local producers should be championed.

This would help producers build scale and invest in and employ a new generation of talent, and steady an industry it describes as “beginning to stagnate”.

Indie producers with bases in Scotland include All3Media’s Lion Television, Zodiak Media’s Comedy Unit and IWC Media, Mentorn Scotland and Matchlight.

The report includes a number of recommendations such as focusing on new production partnerships and commissioner relationships in London, and producers taking better advantage of international opportunities and planning more coherent distribution strategies.

The others are a more rigorous application of ‘out of London’ commissioning quotas, the creation of a dedicated film and TV agency for Scotland, a new development strategy at support body Creative Scotland, and a wider focus on the TV and film sectors at internationally-focused enterprise departments.

“There has been good growth in the Scottish indie sector over recent years but it is slowing and we need to do something now to build on that success,” said John McVay, CEO of PACT.

“That is why we are making these recommendations to all parts of the industry – commissioners, regulators, government and producers themselves – to help develop a new wave of Scottish production companies and build a sustainable Scottish indie sector.”

Recent international deals involving Scottish producers include STV pacting with China’s IPCN on a coproduction agreement in October.

PACT will now share the report, ‘A new model: building a sustainable independent production sector in Scotland’, with relevant stakeholders.

Tags: IPCN, John McVay, Pact